New research states that sun avoidance is killing us!

New research states that sun avoidance is killing us!

By Marc Sorenson, EdD, promoting sun exposure..

The world of science is waking up! New research states that 330,000 lives could be saved by optimizing vitamin D levels through sun exposure.[1] That compares to 450,000 deaths linked to tobacco. This is to be expected, since a Swedish study demonstrated that over a 20- year period, women who avoided the sun were TWICE AS LIKELY TO DIE OF ANY CAUSE, as women who were sun-seekers,[2] [3] and the researchers stated the following: “Nonsmokers who avoided sun exposure had a life expectancy similar to smokers in the highest sun exposure group, indicating that avoidance of sun exposure is a risk factor for death of a similar magnitude as smoking.”

It is no surprise that sun exposure saves lives. Here are a few facts that I have written about on the Sunlight Institute site. Go to news and search the fact you would like to read.

  • As sun exposure in the U.S. has DECREASED by 90% during the last century, melanoma incidence has INCREASED BY 3,000%.
  • A Spanish study shows that women who seek the sun have one-eleventh the hip fracture risk as those who avoid sun.
  • Men who work outdoors have half the risk of melanoma as those who work indoors.
  • Women who totally avoid the sun have 10-times the risk of breast cancer as those who embrace the sun.
  • Sun exposure increases nitric oxide production, which leads to a decrease in heart attack risk.
  • Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, is essential to human survival, and sun exposure is the only natural way to obtain it. Sunbathing can produce 20,000 units of vitamin D in 20 minutes of whole-body exposure.
  • Sun exposure dramatically improves mood through the production of serotonin and endorphin.
  • Beyond vitamin D, sun exposure also stimulates the production of endorphin, nitric oxide and BDNF, all of which are vital to human health.
  • Regular sun exposure also reduces high blood pressure, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis (MS).
  • So enjoy your sunshine, but don’t burn.

[1] David G. Hoel, Marianne Berwick, Frank R. de Gruijl & Michael F. Holick

(2016) The risks and benefits of sun exposure 2016, Dermato-Endocrinology, 8:1, e1248325,

DOI: 10.1080/19381980.2016.1248325

[2] Lindqvist PG, Epstein E, Nielsen K, Landin-Olsson M, Ingvar C, Olsson H. Avoidance of sun exposure as a risk factor for major causes of death: a competing risk analysis of the Melanoma in Southern Sweden cohort.

J Intern Med. 2016 Oct;280(4):375-87

[3] Lindqvist PG, Epstein E, Landin-Olsson M, Ingvar C, Nielsen K, Stenbeck M, Olsson H. Avoidance of sun exposure is a risk factor for all-cause mortality: results from the Melanoma in Southern Sweden cohort. J Intern Med. 2014 Jul;276(1):77-86

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