Sunscreen use in winter? Sunscreen while we sleep? Has the world gone mad?

Sunscreen use in winter? Sunscreen while we sleep? Has the world gone mad?

Be careful of sunscreen use. Sunscreen may be lethal. Yet, there have been suggestions that everyone wear it all day long, including during winter. Furthermore, some are now suggesting that we also wear a special new sunscreen at night. Why? Because, supposedly, this would protect us from the damage that may have already occurred during daytime sun exposure.[1] It seems that the most appropriate description of this message is “insanity.” If the sunscreen used in the day did not prevent damage, why would we need it at night?

Here is your answer regarding sunscreen:

The assault against the sun is a ploy to sell a product. The sellers are doing well. For example, sunscreen sales are a multibillion-dollar business. Especially relevant is the fact that sales in 1972 were about $18 million per year.[2] But, the total USA market for sunscreens in 2005 had climbed to $640 million a year.[3] In 1972 dollars it is equivalent to $320 million, an almost 18-fold increase. However, those figures pale by comparison with figures from 2013: The global sun care market generated 5.6 billion US dollars from its sun-protection products segment. This segment includes sunscreens—many of which are ingredients in cosmetics.[4]

Most noteworthy is this important fact: the first sunscreens appeared about seven decades ago, and melanoma risk has increased by about 3,000% since that time.[5] It seems like more sunscreens = more melanoma. Consequently, we cannot recommend these noxious products. However, the manufacturers of these products can never satiate their lust for more money. Hence, they and their accomplices are now suggesting 24-hour application.

The Powers of Darkness; purveyors of sunscreen.

The Skin Cancer Foundation, which takes donations from many sunscreen manufacturers, has stated: “for adequate protection against melanoma, non-melanoma skin cancers and photo-aging, everyone over the age of six months should use sunscreen daily year-round, in any weather.” Due to this advice, sunscreen sales go ballistic, while the public suffers poor health. Yes, they are suggesting we use their products even in cloudy weather in the winter! How convenient, for an organization that receives sunscreen dollars, to make such a statement. Could it be due to a conflict of interest here?

Consider common sense when considering sunscreen!  Enjoy the sun forget sunscreen.

Each year sunscreen sales increase, and as a result, each year melanoma incidence increases? Does it seem like there is something wrong with that scenario? Those who insist on 24-hour-per-day sunscreen use, probably missed an important study. It compared 571 people with a first diagnosis of melanoma with 913 healthy control subjects. The results, were that those who used sunscreens, were 1.8 times more likely to contract melanoma than those who did not. And, among those who always used sunscreens, so they could stay out longer in the sun, the risk of melanoma was 8.7 times greater than those who did not use them.[6]

How do you protect from too much sun exposure? Not sunscreen!

You may begin to redden or feel too hot. Maybe you should remove yourself from the sunlight?  Most of all, do not use sunscreens. And, you should cover up or seek the shade. That is the way God (or Nature if you prefer) intended it. In conclusion, remember that non-burning sunlight is a friend, so enjoy your friend!

[1] Sanjay Premi, Silvia Wallisch, Camila M. Mano Adam B. Weiner, Antonella Bacchiocchi, Kazumasa Wakamatsu. Chemiexcitation of melanin derivatives induces DNA photoproducts long after UV exposure. Science 20 Feb 2015:347: 6224, 842-847.

[2] Moss, R. Another Dissident Dermatologist. Cancerdecisions.com Newsletter. 2005.

[3] Bonner, C. Contact Kline Co.http://www.klinegroup.com/

[4] http://www.statista.com/topics/1990/sun-care-industry/

[5] Melanoma International Foundation, 2007. Facts about melanoma. Sources: National Cancer Institute 2007 SEER Database, American Cancer Society’s 2007 Facts and Figures, the Skin Cancer Foundation, the American Academy of Dermatology.

[6]Westerdahl J, Ingvar C, Mâsbäck A, Olsson H. Sunscreen use and malignant melanoma. Intern J Cancer 2000;87:145-50.

 

 

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