Tag Archives: Sunlight exposure

Working in Natural Light Improves Mood, Performance, Behavior and Psychological Health.

By Marc Sorenson, EdD.  Sunlight Institute

There are few things that improve our wellbeing like arising early in the morning and walking outside on a bright, sunny day. Our attitude improves, our serotonin and endorphin levels increase and there is an almost immediate feeling of exhilaration. We also become less confrontational, and our minds seem to click on all cylinders. Later on, around midday, if we are fortunate enough to have time to safely sunbathe (with lots of skin exposed), we produce large quantities of vitamin D, and our nitric oxide levels increase. This gives us a delicious feeling of relaxation and an almost instantaneous lowering of blood pressure as the cares of the day melt away.

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Let’s revisit the need for appropriate nutrition in preventing melanoma death.

By Marc Sorenson, EdD, Sunlight Institute

Let’s revisit the need for appropriate nutrition in preventing melanoma death.

It has been well-established that melanoma is not caused by sunlight exposure, despite the sunphobes’ protestations to the contrary. There are numerous research papers that indicate melanoma is considerably less frequent among those who are regularly exposed to sunlight than among those who avoid it.[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] (The references cited here are only a few of the many papers that corroborate the fact that melanoma is less common among those who embrace the sun.)

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Two Recent Research Studies Demonstrate: (1) Sunlight PROTECTS against Pancreatic Cancer; (2) Vitamin D DOES NOT Protect against Pancreatic Cancer.

Research published in the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology demonstrates that there is a strong inverse relationship between exposure to sunlight and the risk of pancreatic cancer, one of the very deadliest cancers.[1] The researchers assessed the association between sun exposure and the incidence of pancreatic cancer worldwide. Those living in countries closer to the equator would be expected to have greater sunlight exposure that those who lived in darker northern or southern countries. The investigators, however, took it one step further; they adjusted the data for cloudiness, which allowed them to determine if the sunnier countries with greater cloudiness had populations with greater pancreatic cancer risk than those sunnier countries with few clouds, and also the influence of clouds in countries farther from the equator.  

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