Tag Archives: sunlight

Sunlight and pandemics. Flashback, additional insights

Sunlight and pandemics-more interesting information about our magnificent Sun, by Marc Sorenson, EdD.

sunlight and pandemics are linkedUse the sun to avoid Parkinson's

 Sunlight and pandemics link together closely—more sunlight, fewer pandemics. This is because it is our “best disinfectant.”  Unobstructed sunlight kills viruses and bacteria outside the body and strengthens the body internally. Sunlight has been preventing diseases throughout history. That is probably why the sun was a deity in some ancient societies. More recently, scientists have been telling us for decades how important sun exposure is, and they continue to do so.

Perhaps it is time to listen!

Thus, research early in 2020, from the DHS, showed that “simulated sunlight” rapidly decayed the Covid-19 virus. The researchers tested effects of sunlight on Covid-19 viruses in aerosols—suspensions of solid particles and liquid droplets in air. These aerosols are a potential route of disease transmission through inhalation. Consequently, when sunlight exposure accelerates the decay of these viruses, it prevents an avenue of human-to-human transmission. Thus, the breathing in of these “decayed” viruses, usually coughed, sneezed, or exhaled, ceases to be lethal. Therefore, sunlight outside the body inactivates the viruses due to rapid decay. In other words, it kills them before they can do damage.

Sunlight and pandemics also link internally through vitamin D production.

Vitamin D, produced by skin during sun exposure, also inhibits some of the powerful disease reactions and makes pandemics less deadly. The cytokine storm is one of those reactions. It may lead to death by causing inflammation and subsequent pneumonia. A cytokine is a specialized protein molecule that attacks and destroys infected tissue. These proteins can be either pro-inflammatory of anti-inflammatory. For our purposes, we will discuss pro-inflammatory cytokines.

How does the cytokine storm work?

Usually, the cytokines needed to fight the infected tissue, cease their attacks and diminish after they have won the battle. However, in the case of a disease like influenza (or Covid-19), “friendly fire” occurs. The immune system recruits millions of reinforcing cytokines, and those cytokines mount an overwhelming attack against tissue they initially protected. In other words, they cause a violent storm. Cytokine storms lead to severe inflammation that weakens or destroys blood vessel membranes in the lungs and other tissue. As a result, fluid seeps through to the air sacs, which leads to pneumonia. People thus end up drowning in their own body fluids. Dr. Angela Rasmussen describes it: “Basically you’re bleeding out of your blood vessels.” She goes on to say the problem may not end there. The storm spills into the circulatory system and can create systemic issues across multiple organs.

How does vitamin D dampen the storm?

 Vitamin D leads to the production of cathelicidins and defensins, which are peptides (proteins) with antimicrobial properties. According to Dr. William Grant and colleagues, these peptides lower viral replication rates and reduce concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines.  As already mentioned, these pro-inflammatory cytokines produce the inflammation that injures the lungs. Nevertheless, the damage does not necessarily end in the lungs. Recent research shows that the  damage from Covid-19 can spread to multiple organ systems.. The report on this research suggests the cytokine storm may be responsible for that spread. The heart, liver, kidneys, neurological system and gastrointestinal tract may all be targets of Covid-19.

 If what I posit is true, we would expect Covid-19 to be higher in populations with high vitamin D deficiency, and such is the case.

 Henry Lahore, one of the great vitamin D scholars, has listed four racial groups with disproportionately high vitamin D deficiency: Elderly Italians, Spanish, Swedish Somalis and African Americans. Mr. Lahore furnishes invaluable information regarding race, vitamin D, sunlight and Covid. Many of you have read of the alarmingly high Covid-19 death rate in African Americans. From my previous research, I know that African Americans also have alarmingly low vitamin D levels. Lahore also cites research that shows 84% of African Americans are vitamin D deficient. In addition, in Chicago, 70% of Covid 19 deaths are among Blacks. The reason for the deficiency? Dark skins take much more time in the sun to produce vitamin D.

Sunlight outside stops Covid-19.

Unfortunately, our answer to Covid-19 has been to cocoon everyone indoors.

The lockdowns assure that no one can obtain vitamin D except by supplement. That is, unless they are fortunate enough to own sunlamps and sunbeds (tanning beds). Even more alarming is the fact that the Swedish Somali population has 40% of the deaths in Sweden. Yet, they comprise only .84% of the Swedish population. Therefore, the Dark-skinned Somalis have 4,700% greater risk of death from Covid 19! This can only be due to lack of sufficient sunlight and subsequently, low vitamin D. No such death risk exists in Africa, where sunlight is ubiquitous. Thus, the answer for all Americans is to obtain plenty of non-burning sun exposure year around, or use a sunbed.

More common sense about sunlight and pandemics from Richard Hobday, researcher and writer.

 First of all, to understand this section, you must know that the flu pandemic of 1918 killed approximately 50 million people. Mr. Hobday explains this in an important paper from 2020, entitled Coronavirus and the Sun: a Lesson from the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

 Here are his most impactful points regarding sunlight and the 1918 pandemic:

 Medical personnel found that patients nursed outdoors recovered better than those treated indoors.

  1. Outdoor air is a natural disinfectant. Fresh air can kill flu viruses and other germs.
  2. In the 1918 pandemic, overcrowding and bad ventilation put soldiers and sailors at high risk of catching influenza.
  3. Most of the victims of the pandemic did not die from influenza: they died of pneumonia and other complications.
  4. Hospital personnel placed sick soldiers outdoors to breathe fresh air [and of course, sunlight]
  5. Open-air treatment reduced deaths among hospital patients from 40 percent down to about 13 per cent.

Of course, in 1918, the efficacy of sun exposure and vitamin D was unknown.

So now, we know. Low sunlight links to high pandemic risks. More sunlight and fresh air produce a better chance of surviving the pandemic we currently face.

It seems like nature knew a better way more than 100 years ago. Safely enjoy non-burning sun exposure or sunbed exposure regularly.

Happy Sunning!

To learn more about the marvelous curative powers of sunlight, visit Sunlight Institute and read the Book, Embrace the Sun.

Sunlight and health

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MS, sunlight: Terrific New and old information

MS is associated closely with lack of sun exposure and low vitamin D levels. So what is new? By Marc Sorenson, EdD

MS photo

MS is a disabling autoimmune disease.

MS is an autoimmune disease in which T-cells initiate an inflammatory response against myelin. This process, known as demyelination, leaves the nerves bare and susceptible to “short circuiting.” As a result, communications between brain and body suffer damage. Eventually, the disease causes irreparable deterioration of nerves. Some of the effects of MS include numbness and weakness in limbs. In addition, there may be lack of coordination, loss of vision, lack of mobility, slurred speech and numerous other disorders.

What do we know about the connection between sun exposure and MS?

Sunlight, the great healer

Sunlight is an immunomodulator. In other words, it may affect the functions of the immune system. In the case of an autoimmune disease, it may stop the immune system’s attack on its own tissue. Because sunlight stimulates the production of vitamin D in skin, it may suggest that vitamin D is protective. In addition, it also suggests the incidence should diminish in areas of high sun exposure, and increases in areas of low exposure.

Thus, the risk of MS in far northern areas is 100 times greater than in equatorial areas.

In equatorial areas, sunlight is intense, and the risk of the disease approaches zero. Another interesting study of immigrants to the UK (low sunlight), but born in the sunny West Indies is enlightening. Especially relevant is that these immigrants had one-eighth the rate of MS as their own children born in the UK. It therefore appears that childhood sun exposure provides protection against the disease.

Where does vitamin D fit?

While it is tempting to chalk up the association of low MS to high vitamin D (as mentioned above), use caution. As with certain other diseases, sun exposure may have a positive influence on MS, independent of vitamin D. For example, a study on animals assessed the relative affect of sunlight and vitamin D on the diseaase. The researchers concluded, “These results suggest UVR [sun] is likely suppressing disease independent of vitamin D production.” They also stated that vitamin D supplementation alone might not replace the ability of sun (UV) to reduce MS susceptibility.

Another more recent study found similar results.

The investigators used animals that had no vitamin D receptors (VDR), and therefore could not produce vitamin D. Therapy with UV light suppressed the disease. The investigators concluded that UV light suppression of MS occurs in the absence of vitamin D production.

Another recent investigation: High sun exposure and high vitamin D both associate with lessened severity of MS.

This study investigated the severity of the disease among people who already had MS. Thus, it was a unique study, to my knowledge. The investigators used the subjects’ latitude (a marker for sun exposure and vitamin D levels) and compared it to MS severity. Interestingly, high sun exposure and high vitamin D levels associated to a reduction in MS severity. However, the investigators listed only sunlight as a sure factor in reducing MS severity.

Hence, the investigators stated three salient points in their paper.

  1. “Observational studies suggested vitamin D-dependent effects, but prospective supplementation studies have so far been inconclusive….”

[This is an important, and a wake up call. Those who believe that we need only swallow a handful of pills, as we avoid the sun, are sadly mistaken. There is no way we can determine if high vitamin D blood levels are the reason for a reduction in MS severity. That is, unless we produce those levels in a scientific, controlled study using supplementation.]

  1. “Although [low] vitamin D cannot be proven as the causal factor, we provide evidence for clinically relevant effects of sunlight exposure.
  2. ”Furthermore, this study suggests sunlight triggered pathways other than vitamin D could play additional and modulatory roles as well.”

There you have it.

High sunlight exposure decreases the severity of multiple sclerosis. Vitamin D, though it is a miraculous nutrient, probably has little or no effect on the disease.

HAPPY SUNNING! 

MS and sunlightYou can find much more information on sun exposure and MS at sunlightinstitute.org. Also, read the book, Embrace the Sun.

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Fishermen soak up sun and avoid skin cancer.

Fishermen receive skin protection through sun exposure and vitamin D, by Marc Sorenson, EdD.

Fishermen boat

Fishermen in Brazil spend plenty of time on the sea and have healthy skin. Furthermore, they soak up vast quantities of direct sun exposure. Thus, should we expect them to succumb to incredibly high rates of skin cancer? No! Does this seem like a paradox? It should not. It is the perfectly natural outcome of plenty of non-burning sun exposure. This will seem clear to you if you have read my book, Embrace the Sun.

Recent research from Brazil produced some large and fascinating surprises. In addition, it changed a few minds regarding knowledge of sunlight’s healthful qualities. First of all, it illuminated sunlight’s protective effects against skin cancer, particularly in fishermen.

So how much sunlight do fishermen in Brazil soak up daily?

Due to their profession, commercial fishermen chronically expose themselves to sunlight. So, in this research, they had soaked up Brazilian sunlight for more than 15 years. The average exposure time was 21 to 28 hours weekly!  Consequently, these fishermen received a sunlight dose 6-8 times higher than indoor workers did. Therefore, you might surmise that they used lots of sunscreen. Yet they did not. It is especially relevant that 62% of this population of fishermen used none. Must we therefore conclude that they suffered exceptionally high skin cancer risk? No. The frequency of skin-cancer diagnoses was 2.7% of the study population of 174 fishermen (and fisher women). The researchers stated, “There was a low prevalence of diagnosed skin cancer among the fishermen when compared to the general population.”

So there you have it. The general population, with comparatively little sun exposure, suffers from a high skin cancer risk.

Yet, fishermen practically bake in the sun every day, and have a minuscule risk of skin cancer. This paradox should be easily understood. Sun exposure is a superb prophylactic against skin cancer and most other cancers if used regularly and safely without burning. Remember that it causes the body to produce vitamin D, which may also provide protection against skin cancer.

For more information on sunlight and health, visit sunlightinstitute.org and read the book, Embrace the Sun.

HAPPY SUNNING!

Your guide to the health effects of sunlight

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More sunlight associated with less Covid-19

More sunlight, less covid 19 by Marc Sorenson, EdD.

More sun, less covid

More sunlight, I said at the onset of Covid-19 (also known as SARS-Cov-2), would be associated with a reduced incidence disease and death. In addition, I stated the disease would make a remarkable resurgence in fall and winter, as availability of sunlight diminished. For that statement, some praised my perspicacity, and others derided my intelligence. I lost some friends on social media and had to unfriend others.

For our purposes, it is important to understand that there are several coronaviruses, and each causes its particular disease manifestation.

In addition, with the possible exception of Covid-19, these viruses are seasonal. Thus, the incidence rates are higher in winter and lower in summer. Could sunlight exposure be the key to the seasonal relationship? Especially relevant, of course, is that Covid-19 was non-existent at the time the other viruses proved their seasonality. It now appears, however, that Covid-19 is indeed seasonal. Thus, I believe that sunlight drives that seasonality.

So what do we to obtain more sunlight  now that winter has arrived?

I suppose it is self-serving to say, “I told you so.” Yet indeed, I did make my prediction, and it was correct. It would have been even more correct if people were encouraged to seek the sun rather than suffer through sunless lockdowns. There is now scientific corroboration that more sunlight associates with less death and disease from Covid-19 and other coronaviruses. Recent research (already dated for 2021), substantiates my ideas on sunlight and Covid-19. In this study, the investigators assessed sunlight available from April 17-July 20, 2020 in various U.S. geographical zones. Then, they compared sunlight availability to the risk of Covid-19 and four other coronaviruses in different areas of the U.S. The graphical abstract they presented is below and makes the same point that I made months ago.

more sunlight, less Covid 19

In areas of strong UV radiation (more sunlight), there was much less risk of testing positive for Covid-19 and the other coronaviruses.

Obviously, people need more sunlight to help protect themselves from Covid-19 and other viruses. Obtaining more sunlight works in at least two ways against Covid-19.

1. Research from the CDC shows that sunlight rapidly kills Covid-19 in aerosols.

Aerosols are suspensions of solid particles or liquid droplets in air. They are potential routes for disease transmission. Sunlight is also able to kill Covid-19 on surfaces.

2. More sunlight exposure causes the skin to produce more vitamin D

. Vitamin D inhibits the overproduction of cytokines, specialized protein molecules that attack and destroy infections. Usually, the cytokine needed to fight the infected tissue stops its attack after it has won the battle. However, in the case of a disease like influenza (or Covid-19), “friendly fire” occurs. The body’s immune system recruits innumerable “extra” or reinforcing cytokines, and those cytokines mount an overwhelming attack against the tissue they initially protected; in other words, they cause a cytokine storm.

Cytokine storms lead to severe inflammation that weakens or destroys blood vessel membranes in the lungs.

This causes fluid to seep through to the air sacs, which leads to pneumonia. A person then ends up drowning in his/her own body fluids. Dr. Angela Rasmussen describes it thus: “Basically you’re bleeding out of your blood vessels.” She goes on to say that the problem may not end there. The storm spills into the circulatory system and can create systemic issues across multiple organs.

Vitamin D, through various mechanisms, retards and stops cytokine storms.

Thus, sun exposure is a two-edged sword: (1) it kills Covid-19 outside the body. (2) It causes the production of vitamin D and can stop the cytokine storm.

So in winter, when there is little sunlight available, and virtually no production of vitamin D, what shall we do?

When there is insufficient sunlight, it is essential to find another source of light that will also produce vitamin D. Sunbeds are the ideal source of the light we seek. Research shows that sunbed users (tanning bed users) in Canada and the U.S. have higher vitamin D levels than any other demographic.

I own a sunbed and go to salons when traveling. This winter, I plan to use my sunbed regularly. In my opinion, it is the best protection against the sunlight deficiency experienced in winter.

For more information on the healthful benefits of sunlight, visit https://sunlightinstitute.org/ and read the book, Embrace the Sun.

Happy sunning!

Embrace the Sun for higher vitamin D power.

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Memory, learning and sunlight: a new brain paradigm

Memory, learning and sunlight by Marc Sorenson, Ed.D

Thinking with sunlight

Memory becomes a worry as humans age, and that worry has spawned a plethora of new anti-forgetfulness products. Based on recent research, we elucidate the manner in which sunlight stimulation of skin may influence important chemical reactions. These reactions improve memory and cognition.

For the purpose of this article, it is necessary to understand the meaning of three terms:

  1. Urocanic acid (UCA): a crystalline acid normally present in human skin, it may play a part in skin protection.
  2. Histidine: a basic amino acid that acts as an intermediary between UCA and glutamate
  3. Glutamate: a chemical that functions as a neurotransmitter and excites cells of the central nervous system

You are probably already forming your own opinion regarding the interaction of sunlight and memory. Let us expatiate on that interaction and unravel a hitherto unknown mystery.

The authors of the aforementioned research noted that seasons of sunlight associated with moderate improvement to physical and mental states. Some conditions you may be familiar with, because we have discussed them at length in these blogs. A few of them are seasonal affective disorder (SAD), bipolar disorder, and depression. Nevertheless, what makes the research so interesting is that it sought answers regarding why sunlight seemed to enhance learning and memory. Moreover, it found a brand new answer.

Because the researchers explored brain neurons to unlock the mystery, they found that UCA existed in many brain regions. This was not something that they had encountered previously, and thus it piqued their curiosity. No other investigators had reported finding UCA in the central nervous system. Yet, they knew UCA was prevalent in skin. Therefore, knowing that sun exposure to the skin produced many photoproducts, they tested a new hypothesis. That hypothesis was that UCA produced by sunlight could be the link that ties sunlight to memory.

How the researchers conducted the experiment

After exposing rats to low-dose UVB exposure (similar to sunlight or sunbed exposure), they observed increased UCA levels in the serum. Moreover, they observed the same increase in UCA levels within the neurons (nerve cells) of the cerebrospinal fluid. Furthermore, they were able to produce the same increases in UCA brain levels by intravenous injection of UCA. This suggests that UCA may cross the blood/brain barrier and enter brain neurons. The authors of the above-cited research stated that UCA is an intermediate part of a conversion of histidine to glutamate. The following graph describes the sunlight>UCA>glutamine>memory connection. (from the authors)

Memory, UCA, Glutamate, Sunlight

Glutamate, as mentioned, excites neurons in the brain. What better way to improve memory?

To test their hypothesis with “mouse memory,” the investigators assessed the ability of the animals to stay on a moving device called a rotarod. In addition, they observed that administration of both UCA and UV exposure enhanced the performance of the animals.

The bottom line regarding sunlight and brain function

Sun exposure improves memory, and UCA (with glutamate) appears to be one of the mechanisms responsible for that improvement.

Happy sunning!

For more information on the health benefits of sunlight, visit the Sunlight Institute and read the book, Embrace the Sun.

Your guide to the health effects of sunlight

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Latitude, sunlight, vitamin D and Covid-19

Latitude, sunlight, and covid-19 by Marc Sorenson, EdD

Latitude,(low) lowers Covid-19 risk

Latitude, when compared to disease and disability, is an attention catcher.  First of all, why would latitude be important? Is it because latitude itself creates disease? Is it because different latitudes lead to different temperatures? Could it be different distances from the magnetic poles are involved in human physiology? No, none of those answers is correct, yet, there is a simple answer to the link between latitude and disease. That answer is sunlight and vitamin D. Low latitudes (closer to the equator) receive much more sunlight, and sunlight is more direct much of the year.

A study of latitude backs the efficacy of sunlight, and possibly vitamin D, on reducing the risk of Covid-19. This was a large, study, drawing reliable data from 88 countries. The researchers compared the countries for Covid-19 death rates and then compared them for the latitude.

The results of Covid-19 death rates compared to latitude.

Highly significant, positive correlations were found between lower mortality rates from Covid-19 and a country’s proximity to the equator. The researchers stated that their evidence suggested a direct correlation between sun exposure and reduced mortality. They also assumed that vitamin D was the photoproduct of sunlight that lowered the risk of Covid-19.

This was a good, timely study in that it established sunlight as a prophylactic for covid-19. Many studies had previously mentioned vitamin D as the primary blood measure to reduce risk of the Covid-19, but none has mentioned latitude as a factor to furnish proof. In addition, neither does this study really furnish proof. That is because the only study that will prove the relationship would be a vitamin D-supplement study.

Sunlight for vitamin D

Other research,which links vitamin D levels to reduced Covid-19 mortality, but does not mention latitude as a factor.

Another recent study on the association of vitamin D levels to covid-19 survival shows promise for vitamin D. It states that fourteen observational studies show that high D levels inversely correlate with the incidence or severity of Covid-19. Yet, we should always remember that sun exposure on skin produces 90% of the vitamin D levels in most populations. Furthermore, 20 minutes of full-body summer sun exposure at midday produces up to 20,000 IU of vitamin D.

Finally, a word about sunbeds (tanning beds)

Sunbeds for heath

Finally, realize that sunbeds (tanning beds) produce vitamin D and enhance health. In addition, it is likely they would also reduce Covid-19. Sunbeds produce vast quantities of vitamin D. People in Canada who use sunbeds have the highest levels of vitamin D in the country, especially in winter. Moreover, a 20-year study demonstrated that both sun exposure and sunbed exposure reduced the risk of death. Women who used sunbeds were 23% less likely to die from any cause than women who did not use them. Another advantage is that latitude does not matter with sunbed use.

From the available research, it is evident that sunlight and vitamin D are protective against Covid-19. Sunlight exposure at midday, or sunbed use, are always the best sources, since sunlight exposure produces many health benefits beyond vitamin D.

For more information on the benefits of sunlight, visit Sunlight Institute, and read Dr. Marc Sorenson’s book, Embrace the Sun.

Your guide to the health effects of sunlight

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Vitamin B3: another prophylactic against skin-cancer

Vitamin B3, other lifestyle factors and skin cancer, by Marc Sorenson, EdD

Vitamin B3 a skin protector?

Vitamin B3 is not a topic I expected to find while checking out the latest on nutrition and skin cancer. Consequently, it surprised me that research showed an impressive effect of vitamin B3 on protection against non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). NMSC are also known as squamous and basal cell carcinomas (SCC and BCC). The protection occurs against UV (ultraviolet) light, which researchers claim is the prime factor causing squamous and basal cell cancers. In the aforementioned study, treatment with vitamin B3, 24 hours before exposure of skin to UV, reduced oxidative stress significantly. It also had the ability to repair DNA damage. This is another study demonstrating that sunlight is not the enemy. Rather, NMSC is due to a combination of factors, including environmental toxins, poor habits of hygiene, smoking, and poor nutrition.

When the skin lacks protection, which is too often the case, then excessive sun exposure can cause damage and pain.

However, that is not what happens in a well-adjusted and well-cared-for life. Protection, whether by vitamin B3 or other additional healthful factors, can stop the damage.  This may render sun exposure one of God’s greatest gifts to human health and wellbeing. Sun exposure is really only a minor factor in NMSC.

Here are factors beyond sunlight (and vitamin B3) that make a difference in this skin cancer:

Smoking predicts a higher risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).  After adjustment for sun exposure, age and sex, smoking predicts a doubling of the risk for SCC. In addition, there is a dose/response relationship between the number of cigarettes smoked and the risk of SCC. Such a relationship also exists among those whose diets lack green, leafy vegetables and whose consumption of meat and fat are very high. Vitamin B3 could be a nutritional factor related to low vegetable consumption and high meat and fat consumption.

Obesity is also an important risk factor for NMSC.

Obesity

One study suggests that being obese changes the tumor microenvironment, due to the chronic inflammatory state that generally accompanies obesity. Furthermore, Cancer mortality maps also indicate that NMSC mortality is highest in regions with the highest obesity (https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/prevalence-maps.html). However, this is not true of regions with the highest sunlight exposure.

The message:

Lack of Vitamin B3 is a factor for an increased number of NMSC and probably for other cancers. Yet, it is only one of many factors that protect the skin. When poor nutrition and other deleterious lifestyle habits disappear, the risk of NMSC decreases. Let us not blame the sun! Enjoy the Sun

Happy sunning!

For more information on sunlight and health, visit sunlightinstitute.org and read the book, Embrace the Sun.Your guide to the health effects of sunlight

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Major factors in Covid-19: Sunlight and Parkinson’s

Major factors for Covid-19. By Marc Sorenson, EdD 

Major factors in Covid and Parkinson's disease

Major factors in Covid-19 and death go far beyond age, lung disease, obesity and heart disease.  Two newer studies show that diabetes and Parkinson’s disease are also associated with death among Covid-19 patients. Although scientists commonly accept diabetes as a risk factor for death from Covid, the Parkinson’s information is new and surprising. The Parkinson’s study involved 80,000 patients and the University of Iowa Health Care Center. It showed that Parkinson’s patients with Covid-19 had a 30% greater risk of mortality (death) due to Covid. Of course, that was when compared to patients who did not have Parkinson’s disease. Thus, the researchers found 5.5% (4,290 of 78,355) of Covid-19 patients without Parkinson’s disease died compared to 21.3% patients with Parkinson’s disease.

What is the answer to preventing Parkinson’s disease and therefore reducing the risk of death from Covid-19?

Parkinson's prevented by sun exposure

First, the answer is not a drug. Rather, the answer is sun exposure. Parkinson’s is a neurologic disease caused by brain cell deterioration, which decreases dopamine and other major factors. Thus, it results in tremors, (especially of the hands) muscle rigidity, shuffling gait and slow speech. It also closely associates with depression, bipolar disorder and chronic fatigue, and that is not surprising, considering the physical and mental difficulty involved. Sufficient dopamine is essential to proper brain function.

Parkinson’s patients do not have sufficient dopamine. In addition, they have far too little BDNF.

That chemical is brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). It is another major factor, because it helps to promote the survival of dopamine neurons. It is especially relevant that exercise tends to increase BDNF. Another major factor in Parkinson’s is serotonin, the body’s major natural “upper” and a major factor in depression. Finally, depression itself is a major factor in Parkinson’s.

Lift the depression with sunshine and BDNF

So how does sun deprivation become one of the major factors in the link between Parkinson’s and Covid-19?

Greater amounts of dopamine, serotonin, endorphin and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) associate with regular sun exposure. Depression also inversely associates with sun exposure. In addition, the onset of bipolar disorder associates with increased hours of daylight at the birth location. If these things were true, we would expect a lower risk of Parkinson’s disease to accompany regular sun exposure. Thus it is. A meta-analysis from Medical Science Monitor showed that people with high sun exposure levels had only 1/50 the risk of contracting Parkinson’s!

An incredible association between sun exposure and Parkinson’s

High sun exposure associates so closely with low risk of Parkinson’s disease that it practically eliminates it. It also associates very closely to the aforementioned major factors for Parkinson’s disease listed above. In addition, we have established that having Parkinson’s increases the death risk from Covid -19 by 30%. It seems like common sense that sunlight would also have a protective effect on Covid-19.

Use the sun to avoid Parkinson's

The bottom line regarding major factors for reducing Parkinson’s and Covid-19.

Sun exposure, therefore, is one of the major factors in reducing risk of Parkinson’s, and Parkinson’s is a major factor in death from Covid-19. Do not neglect regular, non-burning sun exposure.

For more information on Covid 19, Parkinson’s disease and related causes, visit https://sunlightinstitute.org/ and read the book, Embrace the Sun.

Happy sunning!Major factors in Covid-sunlight

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Mental illness, vitamin D deficiency and sunlight

Mental illness: Vitamin D deficiency, and thereby sunlight deficiency, plays a major role. By Marc Sorenson, EdD.

Mental illness can affect anyone.

Mental illness is a pandemic in the United States. Nearly one in five U.S. adults live with a mental illness (46.6 million in 2017).  Mental illness has multiple causes and manifestations. It is especially relevant to understand that sunlight deprivation, leading to vitamin D deficiency, plays a major role in this disorder. It is also important to realize that sun exposure, for typical people, produces about 90% of serum (blood) vitamin D. In addition, this production occurs when midday sunlight touches the skin. However, vitamin D is only one of several photoproducts produced by sun exposure to skin or other body parts. In addition, sun exposure produces serotonin, endorphin, dopamine, and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). Furthermore, all of these vital chemicals has a profound influence on mental Illness.

An important study on vitamin D

Sunlight for vitamin D

The disease is ubiquitous, as is sun deprivation. Thus, thus an investigation on vitamin D and mental illness reminded me of the affects of sunlight. This laboratory-based study found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among 290 patients with mental illness. Consequently, Only 18% of these patients showed adequate levels of vitamin D. To me, this also means that only 18% were obtaining sufficient sun exposure for good mental health and well-being. The researchers concluded that sensible sun exposure could be a boon to mental health.

Let us now discuss a few of the disorders classified as types of mental illness. Then we will also mention the research that indicates an impressive salutary influence of sun exposure.  

ADHD, a mental illness of children

The manic phase of ADHD

ADHD ( attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) is the most prevalent of all mental disorders in children. Hence, it causes significant problems with executive functions, leading to hyperactivity or impulsiveness not appropriate for the person’s age. 

Researchers have found that sun exposure correlates to a decreased risk of  ADHD. They assessed the relationship between the prevalence of ADHD and the intensity of the sun in various nations and in US states. And after adjusting for birth weights, infant mortality and other relevant factors, the findings were not altered. It was obvious that sun deprivation by itself was associated with a higher risk of ADHD.

Autism, another disease of youth

Is autism a sun-deficiency disorder? Autism rates are increasing exponentially and associate to vitamin D deficiency, which, of course, associates to sun deficiency. The Autism Society of America defines autism as “a complex developmental disability typically appearing during the first three years of life and is the result of a neurological disorder affecting the normal functioning of the brain, impacting development in the areas of social interaction and communication skills. Both children and adults with autism typically show difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication, social interactions, and leisure or play activities.”

If vitamin D deficiency and/or sun deprivation relates to autism, symptoms should improve in summer. Thus, a case study reported by Dr. Cannell revealed improvements in autism-related sleep and behavioral problems during summer. Autistic traits such as crying, excitability, hyperactivity and pounding objects profoundly diminished during summer.

Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder (BPD), also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder causing unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to perform day-to-day tasks. Symptoms are severe and can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance and even suicide.https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/bipolar-disorder/index.shtm

Sun exposure resets the body’s circadian rhythms, which are variations in physiology and behavior persistent with a cycle length close to 24 hours.  This system is contained in the hypothalamus and stimulated by nerve cells in the retina of the eye in response to light.  Research indicates that environmental conditions early in life may imprint the circadian system and influence mental function later in life:  Increased number of hours of daylight at the location of birth during the first three months of life are associated with a significantly older age of onset of bipolar disorder. For a longer discussion on bipolar disorder, read the book, Embrace the Sun.

Cognitive disabilities (intellectual disorders)

Another research study, based on a 15-year residential history of varying degrees of sun exposure, produced an interesting result. It showed that cognitive impairment in persons who were below the median exposure to sunlight was 88% greater than in those who were above the median.  These same investigators had previously shown that lower levels of sun exposure resulted in a 2.6-times higher incidence of cognitive impairment. Therefore, if you want to think clearly and keep your marbles, regularly soak up some non-burning sunlight.

Depression

Few people realize how prevalent depression is in our society, a mental illness representing a huge drain on the economy. Moreover, according to Steven Genuis, in an editorial in Canadian Family Physician, “The World Health Organization estimates depression costs the American economy about $44 billion annually, equal to the total cost of all cardiovascular diseases.”  He also stated that in one decade, there was a 300% increase in the sales of antidepressants, making these medications the top-selling pharmaceuticals in the world. (Genuis, S. Keeping your sunny side up (editorial). Canadian Family Physician 2006:52:42-43.)

So what does the sun do to relieve “the blues?”

Use the sun to avoid mental illness

The answer probably lies in a chemical responsible for transmitting impulses between nerve cells. This “neurotransmitter,” serotonin, is a natural “upper,” and works in synchronization with the natural “downer,” melatonin. When we awake to sunshine, light enters the eye and stimulates serotonin production. We then quickly become awake and invigorated, and melatonin diminishes. Nevertheless, at day’s end, the bright light disappears (or at least it should), melatonin levels rise, and serotonin levels diminish. We begin to feel sleepy and ideally retire for a good night’s rest. It is a perfect system for our needs—unless we stay up beyond biologically natural hours, by using artificial lighting. Many experts believe that lack of serotonin is a cause of depression.

The most important study on serotonin

Though I mentioned this study in my previous blog on sunlight and depression, it bears repeating here. Dr. Gavin Lambert performed one of the most important and unique studies on serotonin. He and his colleagues measured serotonin levels in response to varying degrees of sunlight. First of all, they drew blood samples from the internal jugular veins of 101 men. In addition, they compared the serotonin concentrations of the blood to weather conditions and seasons. As a result, men measured on a bright day produced eight times more serotonin, than those measured on a dismal day. Of course, the mood improved due to sunlight, with no involvement whatsoever of vitamin D. Thus, regular, non-burning sun exposure is the answer to depression. In addition, remember that sun exposure also leads to the production of other mood enhancers such as nitric oxide, endorphin and dopamine.

Certainly, sunlight deprivation is not the only cause of mental illness, but it is one of the most important.

There are more mental illnesses to discuss, and I will expatiate on those in a future article. In the meantime, protect your mental health by being sure to obtain your share of non-burning sunlight. For more information, visit sunlightinstitute.org, and read the book, Embrace the Sun.

Happy sunning! Sunshine for health

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Depression, vitamin D, and sunlight.

Depression, vitamin D and sunlight. Which is more important? By Marc Sorenson, EdD

depression taking its toll

Depression is a national horror made worse by fear, worry and lack of sunlight. The Covid-19 pandemic and the tendency to lock people away from sunlight and fresh air has taken an enormous toll.

Depression is more likely to respond to sunlight and vitamin D than sedentary living. That is the message I derived from a recent study. First, the purpose of the research was to estimate cumulative vitamin D doses in 96 depressed patients. These vitamin D doses came from two different sources: solar ultraviolet light, and dietary intake. Another part of the research was to compare vitamin D doses of these depressed patients to 96 age- and sex-matched healthy (non-depressed) controls.

Here are the “Enlightening” results and conclusions.

According to the researchers, there was the major (and probably unexpected) finding. Those with depression had significantly lower vitamin D doses compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Thus, the research again proves the efficacy of sunlight (and possibly vitamin D) for reducing depression. Nevertheless, there was a more important conclusion as stated by the investigators. “While dietary intakes of vitamin D were equal in both groups, patients with depression appeared to have statistically significantly less vitamin D from solar ultraviolet B.” This statement is of transcendent importance due to the establishment of an important fact. That fact is that a superior form of vitamin D results from sun exposure.

Other points to remember regarding sunlight and depression.

In addition to this study, numerous other investigations corroborate the efficacy of sun exposure for ameliorating depression. Serotonin is a potent “upper” that improves mood almost immediately. Sunlight produces Serotonin when it enters the eyes.

The most impressive study on serotonin, sunlight and depression.

Dr. Gavin Lambert did one of the most important studies on serotonin. He and his colleagues measured serotonin levels in response to varying degrees of sunlight. To do so, they drew blood samples from the internal jugular veins of 101 men and compared the serotonin concentrations of the blood to weather conditions and seasons. The remarkable results: Men measured on a bright day produced eight times more serotonin, compared to those measured on a dismal day. Of course, the mood improved due to sunlight, with no involvement whatsoever of vitamin D. Thus, regular, non-burning sun exposure is the answer to depression. In addition, remember that sun exposure also leads to the production of other mood enhancers such as nitric oxide, endorphin and dopamine.

Sunlight and health for all

For more information regarding sunlight and depression, visit sunlightinstitute.org and read the book, Embrace the Sun.

Sunshine for health

 

Happy sunning!

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